Smart-home devices: 3rd-party privacy risks

Rewind to 1996 when I landed a job at Cern in Geneva and started a phase of my life which changed me forever. One of the exceptional engineers I met (Ivan) had configured his home into a primitive version of the 'smart-home' although it wasn't called that then. Everything was connected to a dashboard. He … Continue reading Smart-home devices: 3rd-party privacy risks

Google taking action….

Apparently they are, even beyond prioritising encrypted communications in their search results. Google take action, and they are encouraging you to be a part of this.

So you want to be forgotten?

The RTBF (Right to be forgotten) is a hot topic following the Spanish ruling against Google. The fact is that European Google must first evaluate and remove if considered reasonable search results that threaten the requester's right to personal privacy. It is claimed to be a blow to Freedom of Speech. Google has already received … Continue reading So you want to be forgotten?

The rights of Swedish residents should override the rights of the data controller

I took this from Panopticon Blog concerning the outcome of the Google order. Now what if the rights of the Swedish citizen was to be escalated to the EU courts, would the outcome be the same? "The first question for the CJEU was whether Google was a data controller for the purposes of Directive 95/46. … Continue reading The rights of Swedish residents should override the rights of the data controller

The Right to be Forgotten is respected by the EU Courts

I love this, the EU Court has confirmed that we have the right to be forgotten. Google and other internet search engines face a new world where they must remove links to websites containing certain types of personal data when individuals ask them to do so. The European Union says you have "a right to … Continue reading The Right to be Forgotten is respected by the EU Courts

Don’t use gmail

In fact I wouldn't use any email provider outside of the EU if you an EU resident. A recent court case concludes that you cannot expect privacy when using a third party to manage your email, i.e. it is likened to having an assistant who may open your mail for you.